For The Misfits: Seven Days In June Book Review

Seven Days In June is a romance novel following two characters, Mercy and Shane. Mercy is an author of a popular erotica series called Cursed. She wrote the first book when she was around 19, and after writing 13 books in the series, she is experiencing major writer’s block. The problem is that this series is what’s keeping her a float. Mercy is raising a tween daughter Aubre and wants the best for her. So if continuing with a series that she lost passion for is what she has to do, then so be it.

What’s unique about Mercy is that she suffers from debilitating migraines. She constantly has to give herself pain injections and pop edibles to get through her day. So between the migraines, a very outspoken tween, and having another installment of her book due in a few days, she has a lot going on! That’s not even taking into account her traumatic upbringing. Her mother was constantly changing cities and boyfriends, often leaving Mercy with no friends and having to fight off these men to protect her innocence.

Shane is a New York Times bestselling author working as a creative writing teacher at a private school. He’s not the most social person, and even with him being a huge author, he prefers to fly under the radar. In addition to teaching, Shane mentors kids in low-income neighborhoods to help make a difference. Shane had a very rough upbringing along with a history of substance abuse. He’s been clean for two years and feels that mentoring these kids has played a big part in his sobriety.

When Shane and Mercy bump into each other at a literary event, everyone in the room can feel the air shifting, or at least that’s how Mercy feels. She hasn’t seen Shane in 15 years since the seven days they spent together in June when they fell in love as teenagers. Things ended abruptly, but neither of them has quite moved on. They’ve never experienced anything close to what they had as teenagers during their adult years. Can two misfits carrying a boatload of baggage come together and have something great, a once-in-a-lifetime love? Or should those seven days be left in the past?

Where do I begin??!!! This was such a great story. The author took time to develop each character to let readers understand why they are the way that they are. Both Mercy and Shane have dealt with traumatic emotional trauma. Both learned at an early age to cope with life by self-harming and substance use. Luckily, those were things they overcame and became somewhat functional adults.

One thing that made this book great for me was the emotions I felt while reading. I laughed, I cried, I felt every emotion that Mercy felt during the course of this novel. As a single mother, working full-time and dealing with a health condition, I understood so much of what she was dealing with—choosing not to do everything you want in your personal life due to being so dedicated as a parent. Not willing to risk security or take chances for fear of failing or not maintaining a stable household.

The chemistry between Mercy and Shane just drips off the page. It was great to see how comfortable they are with each other. Even though they tried to fight it, their connection was natural. Both Mercy and Shane walk around with a mask on, covering their true selves until they’re with each other. Each character knows the other’s deepest secrets. They know what makes the other “not normal” or “a misfit,” and they accept it.

Also, I have to give a shoutout to Mercy’s daughter Aubre. She is an amazing tween. She wants to be a celebrity therapist when she gets older. She is excellent at getting people to express their feelings and is even referred to as a “feelings ninja.” She is also a drama queen, but I thoroughly enjoyed her character.

I enjoyed this novel from beginning to end and highly recommend it. Can I get seven days in J̶u̶n̶e̶ August?

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